Chlorine and Public Policy

As a building block element, chlorine plays an important role in fueling policy discussions across the country. See how chlorine is driving conversations about human health, safety, the economy and more.
Transportation

Chlorine is produced in only a few places, but it’s needed everywhere. Consequently a safe, reliable and affordable rail transportation system is essential to chlorine producers, their customers and consumers.

 

Safety

Chemical security has been and will continue to be a priority. Chlorine producers are vigilant in their commitment to safeguard our communities, employees and essential chemical resources and are continually adapting our security to address emerging threats. 

Public Health

Chlorine chemistry is essential to public health. The germ-busting properties of chlorine disinfectants help provide safe drinking water and sanitation, clean swimming pools and safe food production. 

 

Economy

Chlorine chemistry plays a key role in American innovation and job creation. See how chlorine chemistry helps the economy in your state.

Energy

Chlorine chemistry is a critical element of sustainability, resource conservation and energy innovation. 

Public Health

Chlorine chemistry is essential to public health. The germ-busting properties of chlorine disinfectants help provide safe drinking water and sanitation, clean swimming pools and safe food production.

Public Health

Water utilities across the country have in place effective processes to remove contaminants that cause waterborne diseases. The most commonly used processes include coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfecton.

Transportation

Chlorine producers work with railroads, policymakers and first responders to help make the transportation of this essential product safer.

Transportation

Americans depend on products derived from chlorine chemistry. Diverse products from cell phones to bullet proof vests depend on chlorine chemistry in the manufacturing process. Chlorine is transported by rail all over the U.S.

Economy

Since 1980, railroads have consolidated into seven with four of those railroads handling 90 percent of the shipping in the United States. Because of the lack of rail competition, shippers, customers and the U.S. economy are paying a high price.